Aquatic dinosaur may have been a shoreline stalker, not a fish-chaser

Just last year, scientists declared that Spinosaurus was the first dinosaur known to swim through the water, preying upon fish as it did so. A new study, however, suggests that it was probably more of a shore-based feeder.

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Not-so-solitary electric eels observed hunting in packs

It has generally been thought that electric eels are purely solitary animals, which stalk prey on their own. Now, however, scientists have described seeing the creatures hunting in packs – which only nine other fish species are known to do.

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“Amazing” new species of flower discovered in 100-million-year-old amber

The latest amber time capsule discovery comes from Oregon State University researchers who have identified a completely new, previously unknown genus and species of flower dating back 100 million years to the mid-Cretaceous period.

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Common blood pressure drug found to have lifespan-extending potential

Metolazone, an anti-hypertension drug, has been found to kickstart a lifespan-extending cellular repair process in roundworms. The mechanism may be translatable to humans, offering new research pathways in the search for an anti-aging drug.

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Suckerfish seen “surfing” blue whales in world-first underwater footage

A new study has delved into underwater behavior of remora, producing the first-ever continuous recordings of these so-called suckerfish in action and showing how they surf, feed and even socialize on the surface of blue whales.

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Protein injections into testes could treat male infertility

Researchers have developed a way to treat male infertility by delivering nanoparticles loaded with proteins directly into the testes. In tests in mice, previously infertile animals were soon able to father pups at a similar rate as unaffected mice.

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New tardigrade species fends off killer light with a fluorescent shield

The tardigrade is one of nature’s toughest creatures. Now scientists have discovered a new species that adds to an already impressive array of survival tools by employing a type of fluorescent shield to protect itself against lethal UV radiation.

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“New” mosasaur had a fish-grabbing snout like a crocodile

The mosasaur was likely one of the most ferocious prehistoric marine predators. A previously unknown species of the reptile has now been classified, and it sported a crocodile-like snout that may have allowed it to catch prey that others missed.

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Bacterial colonies survive in space for years, could seed planets

A new experiment placing bacteria on the outside of the International Space Station (ISS) has found that micro-organisms can survive in space for years, or even decades. The study lends weight to the idea that life could travel between planets.

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New, multi-tasking taste cell responds to a range of stimuli

Scientists at the University of Buffalo have made a discovery that could shake up what we know about the sense of smell in humans, with the breakthrough focusing on a new type of taste cell with the ability to respond to different stimuli.

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