Were dinosaurs warm- or cold-blooded? Clues lie in their breath and bones

Dinosaurs sit at the crossroads between reptiles and birds, leading scientists to debate whether they were warm- or cold-blooded. A new study may have the answer for different dinosaurs by analyzing metabolic markers from their breath in their bones.

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CRISPR-edited hamsters exhibit unexpected social behavior changes

The biology behind social behavior may be more complex than we thought. Researchers have used CRISPR to block a certain neurochemical signaling pathway in hamsters, and found that the animals’ social behaviors changed in unexpected ways.

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Spider uses film of air to hide underwater for over half an hour

Last year, we heard how anole lizards are able to breathe underwater from an air bubble on their nose. One of the scientists involved in that study has now documented a spider doing something similar – although the bubble covers its whole body.

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Quantum tunneling could drive random DNA mutations, says new study

DNA mutates regularly, for better or worse, driving both evolution and disease. Researchers at the University of Surrey have now found evidence that some of these spontaneous mutations could be caused by the spooky realm of quantum mechanics.

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InBio makes strong progress toward CRISPR-edited hypoallergenic cats

A single protein called Fel d 1 is responsible for the lion's share of human cat allergies, but a company called InBio says its initial research indicates a promising possibility that this protein can be eliminated safely using CRISPR gene editing.

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RNA “evolution” breakthrough offers new clues on the origins of life

Researchers at the University of Tokyo have created an RNA molecule that can not just replicate, but “evolve” into a diverse range of more complex molecules. This find could plug a major gap in the puzzle of how life on Earth began.

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“Mother of stem cells” boast better efficiency when they slow down

Researchers have found that the “mother” of stem cells, known as totipotent stem cells, have a much slower rate of DNA replication, which helps improve their differentiation efficiency. This could lead to major breakthrough for regenerative medicine.

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Largest bacterium ever discovered is longer than a housefly

Biologists have discovered the largest bacterium ever found, with a single cell measuring a mammoth 2 cm long. Visible to the naked eye, this new species has bizarre characteristics that make it like a missing link in the evolution of complex cells.

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Lead ammunition appears to be chronically poisoning American eagles

A new study has found that nearly half of all bald and golden eagles in the USA suffer from chronic and/or acute lead poisoning, which the research team believes is the result of these birds scavenging the remains of animals shot with lead bullets.

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Study suggests that most fishes communicate with sound

We generally don't think of fish as being a vocal bunch – after all, anglers don't typically use "fish calls" to lure them in. According to a new study, however, approximately two-thirds of all fish species probably use sound to communicate.

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