Bacterial colonies survive in space for years, could seed planets

A new experiment placing bacteria on the outside of the International Space Station (ISS) has found that micro-organisms can survive in space for years, or even decades. The study lends weight to the idea that life could travel between planets.

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New, multi-tasking taste cell responds to a range of stimuli

Scientists at the University of Buffalo have made a discovery that could shake up what we know about the sense of smell in humans, with the breakthrough focusing on a new type of taste cell with the ability to respond to different stimuli.

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CT scan solves the mystery of 425-million-year-old long-necked reptile

Mysteries surrounding an ancient, long-necked reptile that lived 242 million years ago have finally been resolved. It's so difficult to understand from its fossils, at one time scientists weren't even sure if it swam in the sea or flew in the sky.

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Squid gene-edited using CRISPR for the first time

Researchers have, for the first time, successfully gene edited a cephalopod. Using CRISPR-Cas9 technology, the research breakthrough will now allow scientists to conduct novel investigations into medical, robotic, and materials innovations.

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Sperm swim like corkscrewing otters, not swishing eels, study shows

Scientists have tapped advanced 3D microscopy and high-speed cameras to shed new light on swimming sperm, upending the centuries-old perception they propel themselves forward by moving their tails side-to-side like an eel.

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Study finds Andean condors can soar 100 miles without flapping

New research, led by Professor Emily Shepard of Swansea University and Dr. Sergio Lambertucci of the Universidad Nacional del Comahue in Argentina, indicates that the Andean condor only flaps its wings one percent of the time it's in flight.

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Giant dinosaurs may have evolved from tiny insect eaters

Research led by scientists associated with the American Museum of Natural History suggests that dinosaurs and pterosaurs descended of a very tiny ancestor, shedding light on how the characteristics of dinosaurs and flying pterosaurs evolved.

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coproID gets the poop on source of fossilized feces

If you were studying the diet of ancient humans, it certainly wouldn't help if you got their preserved feces confused with those of their dogs. A new analytical system system known as coproID is designed to keep that from happening.

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Atom bomb isotopes reveal true age of whale sharks for the first time

A new study has demonstrated how the atomic bomb tests from the Cold War era could help fill in some of the blanks for marine biologists, with scientists using nuclear isotopes to measure the age of the whale shark for the first time.

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American robins head north sooner due to Arctic snow melting earlier

Climate change threatens to shake up the lifestyles of many animals around the world and a new study involving GPS-tagged birds has revealed that for the American robin these wheels are already very much in motion.

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