Study finds that moth wingtips serve as bat-foiling “acoustic decoys”

Because both bats and moths are nocturnal, bats use echolocation to zero in on the insects when hunting them in the dark. A new study, however, suggests that some moths have evolved special wingtips to avoid becoming a meal.

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Blood pressure “barometer” cells discovered in the kidney

Researchers have discovered a population of natural barometers that monitor and maintain our blood pressure. The cellular sensors have for decades been presumed to be located in a certain type of cell in the kidney, but have only now been detected.

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Tomato study suggests fruits can warn mother plants of pest attacks

Because fruits just dangle from the main plant before ultimately falling off, one might think that they are unable to communicate with that plant. According to new research, however, tomato fruits are able to transmit alerts to their mother plant.

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Alien-like extendable secondary jaws allow moray eels to hunt on land

Most fish utilize a mouthful of water to swallow their prey. According to a new study, however, moray eels are unique in not doing so, allowing them to feed while out of the water … with some help from a second set of jaws in their throat.

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Fire ant chemicals may find use as eco-friendly spider deterrent

Although spiders do help us by eating pests such as mosquitos, many people still aren't wild about having the things in their homes. Such folks may be interested in new research which suggests that ant chemicals could be used to harmlessly keep spiders away.

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Flower mimics the scent of dead beetles to draw in helpful flies

Although we've already heard about plants that mimic the smell of rotten meat in order to attract scavengers, botanists have now discovered that a certain plant focuses that concept – it mimics the smell of dead beetles, to draw in one type of fly.

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Study confirms that nose bubbles allow anoles to breathe underwater

The anole lizard may be a popular pet, but here's something that not many people may know: some of the things can breathe while underwater. A new study has confirmed their ability to do so, and explains what makes it possible.

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Popular weed killer impairs insect immune systems, raising malaria risk

New findings are indicating a commonly used herbicide appears to weaken the immune systems of insects. One mosquito experiment suggests the chemical can amplify insect susceptibility to parasitic infection, possibly increasing malaria transmission.

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MRI and CT scan tech used to nondestructively classify “new” octopus

Ordinarily, if biologists wish to confirm that an animal specimen represents a new species, they have to perform a dissection – essentially destroying it. Now, though, the task has been accomplished non-invasively, using MRI and CT scan technologies.

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Computer modelling suggests that T. rex was a slow walker

All walking animals have something in common – their preferred walking speed is largely determined by what's known as "resonance." Bearing this in mind, scientists have calculated what may have been the default walking speed of Tyrannosaurus rex.

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