Graphene used to create “world’s thinnest Christmas tree”

A couple of years ago, Canadian scientists celebrated the Christmas season by creating a microscopic gingerbread house. In that same spirit, Danish researchers have now produced the world's thinnest Christmas tree – and it's made of graphene.

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Biodegradable take on velcro latches on like a parasitic climbing plant

Scientists at the Italian Institute of Technology have developed what they describe as the first biodegradable version of Velcro which, while it won't keep your shoes on, can be attached to plants for the purposes of environmental monitoring.

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Facebook/Meta and Carnegie Mellon team up to develop electronic skin

Facebook recently rebranded as Meta, with an eye toward the development of VR/AR tech. In one of its first projects since the announcement, it's collaborating with Carnegie Mellon University on the development of a touch-sensitive electronic skin.

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Next-gen battery electrolyte made from wood offers record conductivity

Scientists have used cellulose derived from wood as the basis for a solid battery electrolyte, which is paper-thin and can bend and flex to absorb stress as the battery is cycled, while also offering record high conductivity.

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Engineers 3D print force-sensing metamaterial structures

Though you can make objects smarter by adding sensors to them, a team of MIT engineers has managed to 3D print metamaterial structures with electrodes directly integrated into them to allow objects to sense user interaction.

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Kinky class of ceramics self-heals cracks at room temperature

Ceramic materials are strong and can stand up to heat very well, but they’re notoriously fragile. Now, researchers at Texas A&M have uncovered a previously unknown self-healing mechanism in a certain type of ceramic, which works at room temperature.

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Friction-based riveting tech could make magnesium more useful

Although magnesium is known for being lightweight, riveting pieces of it together can be an involved, energy-intensive process. A new technique is claimed to make doing so much simpler, possibly opening up new uses for the metal.

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Perovskite crystals given new job as nuclear radiation detectors

Perovskites are quickly emerging in the solar energy field, thanks to their ability to convert photons into electricity. Now this process has been tweaked to pick up neutrons instead, making an effective detector for leaks from radioactive materials.

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First “fossil-free” steel delivered to Volvo in Sweden

A milestone in decarbonization today as Sweden's SSAB made the world's very first "fossil-free" steel delivery, created with green hydrogen instead of coal and coke, to a customer, Volvo, where it will be used in electric trucks.

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World’s strongest glass can scratch the surface of a diamond

Material scientists in China experimenting with carbon in its many forms have conjured up a form of glass so hard that it can scratch the surface of a diamond, while also having the ability to act as semiconductor.

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