Engineers 3D print force-sensing metamaterial structures

Though you can make objects smarter by adding sensors to them, a team of MIT engineers has managed to 3D print metamaterial structures with electrodes directly integrated into them to allow objects to sense user interaction.

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Kinky class of ceramics self-heals cracks at room temperature

Ceramic materials are strong and can stand up to heat very well, but they’re notoriously fragile. Now, researchers at Texas A&M have uncovered a previously unknown self-healing mechanism in a certain type of ceramic, which works at room temperature.

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Friction-based riveting tech could make magnesium more useful

Although magnesium is known for being lightweight, riveting pieces of it together can be an involved, energy-intensive process. A new technique is claimed to make doing so much simpler, possibly opening up new uses for the metal.

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Perovskite crystals given new job as nuclear radiation detectors

Perovskites are quickly emerging in the solar energy field, thanks to their ability to convert photons into electricity. Now this process has been tweaked to pick up neutrons instead, making an effective detector for leaks from radioactive materials.

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First “fossil-free” steel delivered to Volvo in Sweden

A milestone in decarbonization today as Sweden's SSAB made the world's very first "fossil-free" steel delivery, created with green hydrogen instead of coal and coke, to a customer, Volvo, where it will be used in electric trucks.

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World’s strongest glass can scratch the surface of a diamond

Material scientists in China experimenting with carbon in its many forms have conjured up a form of glass so hard that it can scratch the surface of a diamond, while also having the ability to act as semiconductor.

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Barnacle-inspired bioglue stops bleeding in as little as 15 seconds

It’s hard to get medical adhesives to stick when blood is making everything wet. Now, MIT researchers have developed a new surgical glue that can halt bleeding within 30 seconds, inspired by the super-strong underwater adhesive used by barnacles.

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Metals merged into amalgam nanocrystals in new manufacturing method

A new, surprisingly simple method merges two metals into one nanocrystal structure. This could allow almost any two metals to be combined, creating brand new types of intermetallic nanocrystals that could be useful for a whole range of applications.

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Waste-derived synthetic gypsum could replace the real thing

Composed of calcium sulfate dihydrate, gypsum is a naturally occurring mineral used in building materials. Scientists have now devised a method of creating synthetic gypsum, which should be more energy efficient than processing the genuine article.

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Five forms of eco-friendly plastic that break down fast

By tweaking the process by which plastic is made, scientists hope to offer functional forms of it that safely and naturally degrade in just a fraction of the time. And recent breakthroughs suggest such a future mightn't be all that far away.

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