Using your nose to regenerate knees eroded by osteoarthritis

A clinical trial will soon commence investigating whether nose cartilage can be used to regenerate knee joints that have been severely worn down by osteoarthritis. If successful, the procedure could be an alternative treatment for the condition.

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Stubborn liver cancer may have met its match in century-old TB vaccine

The 102-year-old tuberculosis vaccine shrunk liver cancer tumors in mice, which suggests it may be replicated in a human trial. If this was the case, the vaccine might prove successful in tackling this notoriously hard-to-treat cancer.

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Radioactive ‘fruit sugar’ lights up cancer and inflammation

A radioactive form of fructose, a natural sugar found in fruit, can illuminate cancer and inflammation in medical scans. This approach has the potential to make diseases easier to spot than current techniques, leading to better early detection.

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Fangs a lot! Synthetic antibody could be key to universal antivenom

A universal snake-bite antivenom is within reach, with scientists making an antibody that protects against lethal strikes from a range of elapids. No snakes or ‘donor animals' were needed to produce the antivenom, making it sustainable and scalable.

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Cannabis may be the gateway out of drug addiction

New research has found that daily users of crystal methamphetamine who turned to cannabis to manage their cravings used the stimulant drug less, especially female users. The findings suggest a new harm-reduction strategy is needed.

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Stubborn wounds meet their match in cold plasma jet-charged dressing

A new type of dressing is shaping up as a way to heal chronic wounds without the need for antibiotics. Using a helium plasma jet to activate hydrogel, researchers have created a highly effective antibacterial cover that can swiftly overpower wounds.

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Inhaling graphene is safe, according to human trial

It slices, it dices, it's super strong and conductive, and now an ultra-pure form of ‘wonder material’ graphene has been inhaled during a human trial without affecting lung or cardiovascular function, opening the door to a novel drug delivery mode.

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Single-dose gene therapy may stop deadly brain disorders in their tracks

Researchers have created a single-dose genetic therapy that, in mice, cleared the protein blockages that cause motor neurone disease and frontotemporal dementia, two incurable neurodegenerative diseases that eventually lead to death.

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COPD improved by tweaks to microbiome via fecal transplant or diet

Improving the health of the gut microbiome by way of fecal transplant or dietary modification has been shown to noticeably improve COPD symptoms, opening the door to microbiome-targeted treatments for this currently incurable condition.

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Dementia risk doubled by common herpes virus, study finds

Infection with the virus that’s the main cause of cold sores may double a person’s risk of developing dementia. Adding to growing evidence of a link between the herpes virus and dementia, the findings in a new study may lead to new vaccines.

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