Designer protein helps paralyzed mice walk again in breakthrough study

German scientists have restored the ability to walk in mice that had been paralyzed by a complete spinal cord injury. The team created a “designer” signaling protein and injected it into the animals’ brains, stimulating nerve cells to regenerate.

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Eye membrane removal may help transplanted cells reverse glaucoma damage

Glaucoma can cause vision loss that's currently irreversible. But now scientists have found that removing a membrane in the eye could help transplanted cells migrate into the optic nerve and repair the connections, potentially restoring lost vision.

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Externally powered implant designed to treat obesity

When an obese person really needs to lose weight, gastric bypass surgery is sometimes performed – but it's quite an invasive procedure. An experimental new implant, however, may produce similar results with much less fuss.

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Portable X-ray device would let patients check their own bones

Presently, if someone has been involved in a potentially bone-breaking mishap, they have to be X-rayed by trained staff at a hospital. Soon, however, it may be possible for them to perform their own X-rays, using a compact device that could be located just about anywhere.

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Cancer cells hibernate like “bears in winter” to survive chemotherapy

A compelling study is suggesting all cancer cells may have the capacity to enter states of dormancy as a survival mechanism to avoid destruction from chemotherapy. And the mechanism these cells deploy notably resembles one used by hibernating animals.

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Real-time VR system enhances effect of chronic pain therapy

A new study has found integrating an immersive virtual reality system into a chronic pain treatment can significantly enhance a patient’s pain-relief outcome. The research suggests “digiceutical” therapies may be effective for patients suffering chronic pain.

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MIT implant delivers drugs and the light that activates them

When taken orally or intravenously, medications typically travel throughout the body, producing unwanted side effects. MIT scientists are working on an alternative, that delivers both light and a light-activated drug directly to the target area.

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Glowing bandage monitors oxygen uptake in transplanted tissue

Wired devices called oximeters are the gold standard when it comes to monitoring oxygenation in transplanted tissue, but scientists may have found a better way forward in the form of a paint-on bandage that glows instead.

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“Triple punch” immunotherapy puts Crohn’s disease into remission in mice

Crohn’s disease is an inflammatory bowel condition triggered by an overactive immune system. Now researchers have developed a new kind of immunotherapy for Crohn’s that delivers a “triple punch” by tweaking the responses of different immune cells.

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Synthetic molecules mimic human cells to lure and kill the flu virus

The influenza virus has proven a very tricky foe to fight. Now, researchers at EPFL have developed synthetic molecules that can kill the flu virus by mimicking human cells, and putting the squeeze on the virus when it attaches itself to the decoy.

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