New melanoma test predicts risk of skin cancer spreading

A new test has been developed to assess the likelihood of an early-stage melanoma either spreading or recurring. The test measures levels of several proteins in a biopsy, helping doctors assess which patients require more frequent follow-ups.

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Piezoelectric material shown to help regrow knee-joint cartilage

By stimulating cells to reproduce, electricity has already been shown to help heal soft tissue injuries. Now, an electricity-producing implantable material likewise appears to boost the regrowth of cartilage in compromised joints.

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World-first pig-to-human heart transplant performed in US

In a historic procedure surgeons have, for the first time, transplanted a genetically modified pig heart into a living human. The patient is still alive, has not rejected the organ and is being monitored at the University of Maryland Medical Center.

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Insulin-alternative hormone could open new type of diabetes treatment

Insulin regulates blood glucose levels, and issues often lead to diabetes. But now, scientists at the Salk Institute have identified another molecular pathway that regulates blood glucose, which could open up a brand new avenue for treating diabetes.

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Protein structure discovery lays foundation for dog allergy vaccine

Scientists in Japan investigating the possibility of a vaccine for people allergic to dogs have made a significant breakthrough, identifying the crystal structure of a protein at the heart of the majority of dog allergies for the first time.

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Live view of mysterious Parkinson’s protein points to new treatments

For around a decade, scientists researching Parkinson's disease have been probing a pathway involved in the way brain cells process energy, and now a mystery around the role of a particular protein has been solved thanks to a new live action view.

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Anthrax toxin may be the key to new pain-blocking therapies

Early preclinical work led by researchers from Harvard has found elements in a toxin produced by the anthrax bacterium can silence activity in pain-signaling brain neurons. The research raises the prospect of a new model for future pain therapeutics.

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Targeting “pre-resistant” bacteria could stop superbugs from forming

In a significant breakthrough, scientists have pinpointed signs of "pre-resistance" in bacteria for the first time, which they say could allow for better targeted therapies that nip superbugs in the bud before they develop resistance to drugs.

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Mobile MRI machine detects brain disorders at a fraction of the cost

MRI is a powerful diagnostic tool, but the size and cost limits where it can be used. A compact, affordable new MRI system uses a much smaller magnetic field and doesn’t require shielding, and is still able to diagnose brain disorders in patients.

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Cannabis cuts seizures by 86 percent in epileptic children

A study has found epileptic children treated with whole plant cannabis products displayed reductions in seizure frequency. The researchers call for clinical trials to test whether whole plant products are better at treating epilepsy than CBD alone.

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