Boreas composite off-road camper trailer leaves the wood in the forest

Before getting its pop-top flagship to market, Boreas Campers has launched a simpler model aimed at buyers who want the advantage of its tough, zero-wood construction without laying out $30 grand on a fully equipped trailer. The new AT takes the same 15.5-foot (4.7-m) form as the company’s signature XT but brings only the structural and electrical bones, leaving equipment choices like stove, fridge/cooler and water storage to the buyer.

Originally called Into the Wild Overland, Boreas got its start in 2015 as an expedition vehicle rental company before quickly expanding into trailer manufacturing a year later. In 2018, it eliminated every last sawdust spec from its factory floor, building up a reputation for tough-but-lightweight trailers with absolutely no wood in their construction.

By relying only on steel, aluminum and composites, Boreas eliminated the rot, mold and degradation that can send wood-framed trailers to an early retirement in the junkyard, and advertised a more robust design meant to last a lifetime. In fact, it backs that up with a lifetime chassis and exoskeleton warranty.

The AT follows the XT and moto-hauling MXT to become the third trailer in Boreas’ lineup. Boreas prefers not to use the term “base model” because, unlike the empty trailer shells or pickup toppers to which that term often refers, the AT is more robustly equipped for hitch-and-go all-terrain camping. For starters, it has the same combination of 3 x 2-in powder-coated steel tube frame and fiberglass composite/aluminum body as the XT models. It also rides on BFGoodrich KO2 all-terrain tires beaded to 16-in steel wheels cushioned by a 3,500-lb (1,585-kg) heavy-duty Timbren Axle-Less suspension.

A look at the steel frame and Timbren suspension
A look at the steel frame and Timbren suspension

Boreas Campers

The AT shares its basic interior layout with the XT, featuring composite cabinets and a 57 x 79 x 4.5-in (145 x 201 x 11.4-cm) near-queen mattress. The insulated walls are paneled in maple-look FRP composite, the floor made from FRP diamond plate. Packaged standard are a 10-speed Maxxair fan, LED interior and porch lighting, and a power panel with 110V/12V/USB outlets for convenient plug-in. The lights, fan and plugs come to life under power from the standard electrical package wired to a 125-Ah deep-cycle battery.

The Boreas AT bed is roughly queen size, offering 79 in of length
The Boreas AT bed is roughly queen size, offering 79 in of length

Boreas Campers

The biggest difference between AT and XT is found inside the tailgate. Instead of a full galley with slide-out fridge/freezer, stove and sink, the AT’s galley is an empty storage compartment. It’s designed as a plug-and-play kitchen complete with composite cabinets, stainless steel counter, cargo space and 110V/12V/USB outlets. It also has dimmable LED lighting.

In place of slide-outs and kitchen equipment, the AT packs an empty galley designed for the owner to build out or fill up
In place of slide-outs and kitchen equipment, the AT packs an empty galley designed for the owner to build out or fill up

Boreas Campers

While a fully equipped trailer is always nicer to look at, what’s nice about a simpler, emptier design like the AT is that owners can save money up front and build the trailer into a mini-home over time. So the year the big trailer bill comes due, the owners can camp cheaply, loading up basic equipment like portable canister stoves, water jugs and plastic coolers. Down the line, they can add more permanent hardware like a fridge and stove slide, should they want something cleaner and more integrated. With its electrical already wired, the AT makes it easy to pop in a fridge/freezer and other electric accessories.

Other notable standard AT features include a custom aluminum roof rack, ARB awning, electric brakes, full-size spare tire, custom aluminum tongue box, and diamond-plate fenders with step-ups. Equipment that’s lost in the drop from XT spec includes the water tank and pump, forced-air furnace, 11-lb (5-kg) propane tank, water heater and outdoor shower, and solar charging.

Boreas releases a more simply equipped, less expensive off-road trailer option
Boreas releases a more simply equipped, less expensive off-road trailer option

Boreas Campers

The AT trailer weighs 1,850 lb (839 kg) dry, giving it around 1,600 lb (725 kg) of payload before encroaching on the 3,500-lb limit of the Timbren suspension. It starts at US$18,900, which, while well more than a number of other base-model squaredrop and teardrop trailers, leaves a nice chunk of change in the buyer’s pocket as compared to the $29,990 XT.

We should be taking a look at Boreas again pretty soon because its social media shows the four-person XT12 pop-up trailer coming along nicely.

Source: Boreas Campers

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